Exploring the Relationship between U.S. Jamaican Immigrants’ Cultural Beliefs and Conflict Management Styles as These Correlations are Related to Their Perceived Job Satisfaction and Job Performance Dissertation

thesis or dissertation chair

fiu authors

  • Grey, Keisha S

abstract

  • Immigrant numbers in developing and first world countries are increasing, and immigrants are bringing with them to the host country their set of attitudes, customs, habits, interests and traditions. Due to this influx of immigrants, conflict situations between employees are on the rise and are more difficult to resolve when compared to conflicts that are within the same cultural groups. If organizations are better able to understand the relationship between the cultural beliefs and conflict management styles of employees, they can help them utilize conflict management styles in specific situations to result in increased job satisfaction and job performance. This collected papers dissertation explored the relationship between U.S. Jamaican immigrants’ cultural beliefs, and conflict management styles related to perceived job satisfaction and job performance. There were two studies completed in fulfillment of this collected papers dissertation.

    STUDY #1: The purpose of this structured literature review was to systematically examine the literature on conflict management style and perceived job satisfaction and job performance. STUDY #2: The purpose of this cross-sectional, explanatory study was to examine the relationship between the cultural beliefs and conflict management styles of U.S. Jamaican immigrants, and their job satisfaction and job performance in the workplace. Quantitative data were examined in two stages using SPSS 23. In the first stage, descriptive statistics were used. Second, a moderated regression analysis and linear regression were done. It was found in study #1, that the two conflict management styles that were associated with increased job satisfaction and job performance with were integrating and compromising conflict management styles (Zhang et al., 2015). In study #2, it was found that the dominant conflict management style for U.S. Jamaican immigrants was collaborating. However, the only conflict management style that was found to be a significantly positive moderator for the relationship between job satisfaction and job performance was compromising conflict management style. This finding is consistent with the finding from Study #1, where Zhang et al. (2015) found that employees who use compromising conflict management style were more satisfied and had higher levels of job performance.

publication date

  • March 27, 2017

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)