Underage Drinking in Latino Youth Grant

abstract

  • Underage Drinking in Latino Youth Abstract Alcohol use during adolescence is an important problem in the United States. Of particular interest are the alcohol use patterns of Latino populations and the development of alcohol abuse prevention strategies targeting Latino adolescents. The present research applies an integrated conceptual model to the analysis of Latino adolescent drinking in grades 7, 8 and 9. The model emphasizes traditional variables used to explain alcohol use in adolescence (e.g., behavioral intentions, expectancies, norms, self efficacy, affect, self image/concept, knowledge). In addition, the impact of variables directly tied to Latino culture will be studied (familismo, machismo, marianismo, acculturation, acculturation stress). Interviews will be conducted with approximately 700 (after attrition) adolescents and their mothers, twice each year for three years. The time span encompasses the transition from middle school to high school, a crucial period in adolescent development. Data will be collected from both mothers and adolescents. The research will elucidate the developmental dynamics of the emergence of under-age alcohol use in inner city, Latino populations representing Puerto Ricans and Dominicans living in the South Bronx of New York City. Structural equation modeling and growth curve modeling will be used to examine the relationship between Latino parenting, adolescent alcohol use and factors that impact such use with the transition to high school. The research analyzes adolescent alcohol use from an individual perspective, a family perspective and a cultural perspective, providing an integrated analysis across time. The research will lead to suggestions about the development of effective prevention strategies aimed at reducing alcohol use in underage Latino populations. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The aim of the proposed research is to test developmental models of alcohol use for Latino middle school youth as they transition to high school. The research will inform the design of future interventions by identifying variables to target in such interventions and will inform us of the generalizability of the effects of variable change across gender, Latino ethnicity and transitions from middle school to high school.

date/time interval

  • July 1, 2009 - August 31, 2011

sponsor award ID

  • 1R01AA016212-01A2

local award ID

  • AWD000000000845

contributor

keywords

  • Accidental Injury
  • Accounting
  • Acculturation
  • Adolescence
  • Adolescent
  • Adolescent Development
  • Adult
  • Affect
  • Age
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Alcohols
  • Behavior
  • Behavioral
  • Burn injury
  • Cessation of life
  • Climate
  • Communication
  • Data
  • Development
  • Dominican
  • Drowning
  • Drug usage
  • Emotions
  • Equation
  • Ethnic Origin
  • Expectancy
  • Exposure to
  • Family
  • Future
  • Gender
  • Growth
  • Health
  • Heavy Drinking
  • Hispanics
  • Homicide
  • Individual
  • Intervention
  • Interview
  • Knowledge
  • Latino
  • Lead
  • Life
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Mainstreaming
  • Mediation
  • Mediator of activation protein
  • Memory
  • Modeling
  • Monitor
  • Mothers
  • National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
  • Nature
  • New York City
  • Parenting behavior
  • Parents
  • Pattern
  • Prevention strategy
  • Public Health
  • Puerto Rican
  • Relative (related person)
  • Reporting
  • Research
  • Research Personnel
  • Role
  • Schools
  • Self Concept
  • Self Efficacy
  • Self Perception
  • Social Problems
  • Stress
  • Suggestion
  • Supervision
  • Testing
  • Time
  • United States
  • Unsafe Sex
  • Youth
  • abstracting
  • alcohol abuse prevention
  • alcohol poisoning
  • base
  • binge drinker
  • binge drinking
  • cohort
  • coping
  • cost
  • design
  • drinking
  • drinking behavior
  • early adolescence
  • experience
  • falls
  • high school
  • inner city
  • interest
  • male
  • middle school
  • peer
  • public health relevance
  • reduced alcohol use
  • suicidal risk
  • theories
  • trend
  • underage drinking
  • willingness