Alcohol Use Trajectories of Latino Immigrants during their First Decade in the US Grant

abstract

  • ? The escalation of regular and problematic alcohol use among Latino immigrants as their time in the United States (US) increases is a well-documented but not well-understood phenomenon. Evidence suggests that shifts in cultural factors related to the acculturation process, such as a waning of protective cultural values, are partially responsible for rises in such health compromising behaviors. The overarching aim of the present study is to examine how changes in social determinants interact with various cultural mechanisms (i.e., cultural practices, cultural values, cultural identifications) to impactpre- to post-immigration alcohol use trajectories of early adult recent Latino immigrants during their first decade in the US. The proposed study builds upon our Recent Latino Immigrant Study (RLIS) (P20MD002288; PI: De La Rosa) by collecting an additional 3 annual waves of data from the original RLIS sample. The RLIS was the first prospective cohort study to document the pre-immigration alcohol use behaviors of early adult recent Latino immigrants, as well as the underlying social determinants contributing to these trajectories after immigration. Baseline data collected retrospective pre- immigration information from 527 early adult Latinos who had immigrated to the US within the last year. Two follow-ups, 12 months apart, collected post-immigration data. Rather than indicating typical patterns of increased alcohol use among women (and little change in men) over time, our findings revealed decreases in alcohol use for documented (but not undocumented) men with no significant change in women. Results revealed associations between various social determinants as potential risk/protective factors of acculturative stress and alcohol use. Collectively, these outcomes suggest that, for at least some subsets of Latino immigrants, the well-known escalation of alcohol use as their time in the US increases may not hold. There is a need for future research that identifies how risk/protective social determinants interact with various cultural mechanisms to impact distinct pre- to post-immigration alcohol use patterns among male and female recent Latino immigrants as their time in the US increases. The aims of the proposed study are to: 1) Examine how changes in pre- to post-immigration risk/protective social determinants impact alcohol use trajectories among male and female early adult Latino immigrants, 2) Identify how cultural mechanisms impact the alcohol use trajectories of male and female early adult Latino immigrants, 3) Determine the moderating role of cultural mechanisms on the relationship between changes in pre- to post-immigration social determinants and alcohol use trajectories among male and female Latino immigrants during early adulthood. Recognizing the personal and social contexts in which cultural mechanisms influence alcohol use patterns among Latino immigrants is a critical step in developing effective and culturally appropriate interventions thattarget associated vulnerability factors and take advantage of key protective factors in this population.

date/time interval

  • September 20, 2016 - June 30, 2021

sponsor award ID

  • 1R01AA024127-01A1

local award ID

  • AWD000000005894

contributor

keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Age
  • Alcohol abuse
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Area
  • Attenuated
  • Behavior
  • Biogenesis
  • Central America
  • Cohort Studies
  • Communities
  • Cuba
  • Data
  • Family
  • Female
  • Growth
  • Health
  • Heavy Drinking
  • Immigrant
  • Immigration
  • Intervention
  • Investigation
  • Knowledge
  • Latino
  • Legal Status
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Mexican
  • National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
  • Outcome
  • Participant
  • Pattern
  • Policy Developments
  • Population
  • Population Heterogeneity
  • Process
  • Public Health
  • Research
  • Risk
  • Risk Factors
  • Risk-Taking
  • Role
  • Rosa
  • Sampling
  • Sampling Studies
  • Social Environment
  • Social Policies
  • Social support
  • South America
  • Stress
  • System
  • Time
  • United States
  • Woman
  • alcohol misuse
  • base
  • cohesion
  • cultural values
  • drinking
  • emerging adult
  • experience
  • health disparity
  • male
  • men
  • prospective
  • public health relevance
  • retention rate
  • social