Relative Importance of Personality Dimensions for Expatriate Selection: A Policy Capturing Study Article

Ones, DS, Viswesvaran, C. (1999). Relative Importance of Personality Dimensions for Expatriate Selection: A Policy Capturing Study . 12(3-4), 275-294. 10.1080/08959289909539872

cited authors

  • Ones, DS; Viswesvaran, C

abstract

  • Policy capturing was used to examine relative importance placed by managers on the Big Five personality factors (Emotional Stability, Extraversion, Openness to Experience, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness) in the context of expatriate selection. Ninety-six managers with expatriate staffing and management experience made judgments about 32 expatriates based on characteristics associated with the Big Five. Judgments were made about (a) completion of overseas assignment, (b) adjustment, (c) interpersonal relations with host-country nationals, and (d) overseas job performance. Across all four decisions, the raters tended to use the cues (i.e., the Big Five personality factors) in a similar manner. Conscientiousness was perceived to be the most important personality factor for all four judgments examined. Openness to Experience was perceived to be important for completion of overseas assignment. These results from policy capturing are compared and contrasted with those from criterion-related validity studies of the Big Five for expatriate selection. Implications for expatriate selection systems are discussed.

publication date

  • January 1, 1999

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 275

end page

  • 294

volume

  • 12

issue

  • 3-4