State-Outcome Consistency in Smoking Relapse Crises: A Reversal Theory Approach Article

Potocky, M, Gerkovich, MM, O'Connell, KA et al. (1991). State-Outcome Consistency in Smoking Relapse Crises: A Reversal Theory Approach . 59(2), 351-353. 10.1037//0022-006x.59.2.351

cited authors

  • Potocky, M; Gerkovich, MM; O'Connell, KA; Cook, MR

fiu authors

abstract

  • Previous investigations of smoking relapse crises have found limited within-subject consistency. Several investigators have suggested that greater consistency might be observed if situations were described phenomenologically. Reversal theory provides one phenomenological framework. Two relapse crises from each of 49 ex-smokers were compared, using reversal theory constructs. Maintaining abstinence in both crises was consistently associated with being in serious-minded (telic) and conformist states. Smoking in both crises was consistently associated with being in playful (paratelic) or negativistic states. Crises with different outcomes occurred in different state combinations. The findings suggest that coping strategies should be state-tailored for optimal effectiveness.

publication date

  • January 1, 1991

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 351

end page

  • 353

volume

  • 59

issue

  • 2