Reversal theory analysis of relapse crises following smoking cessation Article

Gerkovich, MM, Cook, MR, O'Connell, KA et al. (1993). Reversal theory analysis of relapse crises following smoking cessation . 22(2), 91-97. 10.1016/0738-3991(93)90005-H

cited authors

  • Gerkovich, MM; Cook, MR; O'Connell, KA; Potocky, M

fiu authors

abstract

  • Smoking continues to be a habit that is extremely difficult to change despite increasing social pressure to do so. Models that look for consistency within individuals do not adequately account for the high rate of relapse following smoking cessation. Reversal theory provides an excellent framework for understanding the situations in which ex-smokers are at greatest risk of smoking. This paper discusses the application of reversal theory to research on smoking cessation and relapse. A two-phase study using interview data was conducted to test the relationship between reversal theory constructs and smoking outcome. Interviews were obtained from 3 to 15 months after cessation in phase 1 and from 2 to 26 weeks after cessation in phase 2. In phase 1, ex-smokers were significantly more likely to smoke when tempted while in either paratelic or negativistic states. In phase 2, ex-smokers were significantly more likely to smoke when tempted while in either paratelic or mastery states. These results suggest that future smoking cessation programs should incorporate state-specific interventions to deal with temptations to smoke. © 1993.

publication date

  • December 15, 1993

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 91

end page

  • 97

volume

  • 22

issue

  • 2