Understanding the spatiotemporal variability of hydrological processes for integrating watershed management and environmental public health in the great river basin, Jamaica Book Chapter

Setegn, SG, Melesse, AM, Grey, O et al. (2015). Understanding the spatiotemporal variability of hydrological processes for integrating watershed management and environmental public health in the great river basin, Jamaica . 533-561. 10.1007/978-3-319-12194-9_28



cited authors

  • Setegn, SG; Melesse, AM; Grey, O; Webber, D

abstract

  • The demand for adequate and safe supplies of water is becoming crucial especially in the overpopulated urban centers of the Caribbean islands. Moreover, population growth coupled with environmental degradation and possible adverse impacts of land use and climate change are major factors limiting freshwater resource availability. The main objective of this study is to develop a hydrological model and analyze the spatiotemporal variability of hydrological processes in the Great River basin, Jamaica. Physically based hydrological model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), was calibrated and validated in the basin. Spatial distribution of annual hydrological processes, water balance components for wet and dry years, and annual hydrological water balance of the Great River basin are discussed. The basin water balance analysis indicated that surface runoff contributes more than 28 %, whereas the groundwater contributes more than 18 % of the stream flow. The water balance components differ spatially between each subbasin. The actual evapotranspiration varies between subbasins which range from 887 to 1,034 mm. The variation in evapotranspiration between subbasins is mainly due to variations in land cover. The model can be used to predict watershed responses to climate and land use changes. Hydrological water balance analysis can be used to predict the existing water resource component that can help manage water availability and predict where and when there will be water shortages. The output of water balance study can be used in irrigation potential assessment, runoff assessment, flood control, and pollution control.

publication date

  • September 4, 2015

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 533

end page

  • 561