" No jobs, more crime. More jobs, less crime" : Structural factors affecting the health of Latino men in Detroit Article

Lopez, WD, Graham, LF, Reardon, C et al. (2012). " No jobs, more crime. More jobs, less crime" : Structural factors affecting the health of Latino men in Detroit . 9(4), 255-260. 10.1016/j.jomh.2012.03.007

cited authors

  • Lopez, WD; Graham, LF; Reardon, C; Reyes, AM; Reyes, A; Padilla, M

fiu authors

abstract

  • Background: Latinos comprise 14% of the United States (U.S.) population, and approximately 75% of Latinos in the U.S. are immigrants or children of immigrants. Urban Latino men face a distinct set of structural barriers that may influence their health and well-being. The collapse of the automobile industry in Detroit, Michigan, contributed to increased rates of racially stratified unemployment. Method: Through semi-structured interviews and ethnography, we present a case study of nine Latino men who face decreasing opportunities for formal employment and navigate the constant threat of violence and deportation in the face of Detroit's rapid deindustrialization. Results: In light of scarce work opportunities, participants sought income from the informal labor sector. This work was often illegal or dangerous, such as drug dealing, and perpetuated a cycle of violence. The threat of violence and deportation limited mobility and contact with authorities, especially among undocumented participants. Conclusion: In order to promote the health of urban Latino men, a careful consideration of the structural factors that shape their lives is essential. Interventions should work to leverage an extensive skill set and drive to work into meaningful formal employment, and consider the overarching effects of documentation on social mobility. © 2012 WPMH GmbH.

publication date

  • December 1, 2012

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 255

end page

  • 260

volume

  • 9

issue

  • 4