Does attending an all-day kindergarten have an effect on mathematics achievement? Article

Chang, M, Driscoll, LG, Sung, YY. (2008). Does attending an all-day kindergarten have an effect on mathematics achievement? . 3(4), 219-229. 10.18848/1833-1882/cgp/v03i04/52589

cited authors

  • Chang, M; Driscoll, LG; Sung, YY

fiu authors

abstract

  • The study explores the longitudinal effects of all-day kindergarten on student's mathematics achievement from the fall of kindergarten through the spring of first grade. Using data from the first four rounds of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey-Kindergarten (ECLS-K) from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) in the United States, two sets of two-level hierarchical linear models were performed as longitudinal multilevel analyses. The first set included the entire student population as one model and the second set consisted of five separate HLM models, each representing one of five socio-economic (SES) quintiles. We found: (1) when the analyses included the entire population, the all-day kindergarten students begin with significantly higher math scores, but do not show significantly different rates of change as compared to their half-day kindergarten counterparts; and (2) when the analyses are applied to the five SES quintiles, the all-day students of the lower two SES groups and the highest SES group show significantly higher initial scores than do those of the half-day students, although the change rates for the scores in all the SES groups do not differ. © Common Ground.

publication date

  • January 1, 2008

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 219

end page

  • 229

volume

  • 3

issue

  • 4