Changes in primary afferent depolarization of sensory neurones during peripheral nerve regeneration in the cat. Article

Horch, KW, Lisney, SJ. (1981). Changes in primary afferent depolarization of sensory neurones during peripheral nerve regeneration in the cat. . 313(1), 287-299. 10.1113/jphysiol.1981.sp013665

cited authors

  • Horch, KW; Lisney, SJ

fiu authors

abstract

  • 1. Micro‐electrode recordings were made from normal and regenerating sural nerve fibres in cats. Increases in the excitability of the central terminals of these fibres after conditioning stimulation of other sural nerve fibres were taken as evidence for primary afferent depolarization. 2. At all recovery times studied the excitability changes seen were significantly less than those seen in control animals. Two factors contributed to the changes in primary afferent depolarization. First, the proportion of fibres that showed no evidence of primary afferent depolarization increased significantly. This proportion became smaller as recovery progressed. Secondly, where primary afferent depolarization was present, the magnitudes of the effects were slightly but significantly decreased compared with control values. 3. Excitability changes of the central terminals of sural nerve fibres were also measured after conditioning stimulation of the ipsilateral, unlesioned accessory sural nerve. One month after sural nerve transection there was a significant increase in the proportion of fibres showing no evidence of excitability changes following accessory sural nerve conditioning stimulation compared with control animals. Thus, the loss of primary afferent depolarization of regenerating sural nerve fibres was neither simply a consequence of desynchronization of the volley of impulses entering the spinal cord after conditioning stimulation of other regenerating sural fibres, nor due to fewer fibres being activated during conditioning stimulation of the lesioned nerves. 4. A possible explanation of these results is that after peripheral nerve crush or transection the central terminals of the damaged fibres retract or atrophy. Then as regeneration of the nerve proceeds, the central terminals of the fibres re‐form. © 1981 The Physiological Society

publication date

  • April 1, 1981

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 287

end page

  • 299

volume

  • 313

issue

  • 1