Criminal versus HUMINT interrogations: The importance of psychological science to improving interrogative practice Article

Evans, JR, Meissner, CA, Brandon, SE et al. (2010). Criminal versus HUMINT interrogations: The importance of psychological science to improving interrogative practice . 38(1-2), 215-249. 10.1177/009318531003800110

cited authors

  • Evans, JR; Meissner, CA; Brandon, SE; Russano, MB; Kleinman, SM

fiu authors

abstract

  • The discovery of many cases of wrongful conviction in the criminal justice system involving admissions from innocent suspects has led psychologists to examine the factors contributing to false confessions. However, little systematic research has assessed the processes underlying Human Intelligence (HUMINT) interrogations relating to military and intelligence operations. The current article examines the similarities and differences between interrogations in criminal and HUMINT settings, and discusses the extent to which the current empirical literature can be applied to criminal and/or HUMINT interrogations. Finally, areas of future research are considered in light of the need for improving HUMINT interrogation. © 2010 by Federal Legal Publications, Inc.

publication date

  • January 1, 2010

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 215

end page

  • 249

volume

  • 38

issue

  • 1-2