The effects of race on relationships with the police: A survey of African American and Latino youths in Chicago Article

Lurigio, AJ, Greenleaf, RG, Flexon, JL. (2009). The effects of race on relationships with the police: A survey of African American and Latino youths in Chicago . 10(1), 29-41.

cited authors

  • Lurigio, AJ; Greenleaf, RG; Flexon, JL

fiu authors

abstract

  • Race is one of the most powerful variables explaining public attitudes toward the police. The majority of studies on race and perceptions of the police have explored differences between African Americans and Whites. The emphasis of previous research on black-white comparisons has left unanswered many questions about minority group differences in attitudes toward the police, especially differences between Latinos and African Americans. The present study explored whether the police-related views of African American and Latino students differ. We compared African American and Latino youths on their attitudes, feelings, and behavioral intentions toward the police. Our independent measures included prosocial values, commitment to school, and contact with the police. We found several similarities between Latino and African American students on the dependent measures. We discuss the implications of our findings for police practices.

publication date

  • June 1, 2009

start page

  • 29

end page

  • 41

volume

  • 10

issue

  • 1