A high performance sensorimotor beta rhythm-based brain-computer interface associated with human natural motor behavior Article

Bai, O, Lin, P, Vorbach, S et al. (2008). A high performance sensorimotor beta rhythm-based brain-computer interface associated with human natural motor behavior . 5(1), 24-35. 10.1088/1741-2560/5/1/003

cited authors

  • Bai, O; Lin, P; Vorbach, S; Floeter, MK; Hattori, N; Hallett, M

fiu authors

abstract

  • To explore the reliability of a high performance brain-computer interface (BCI) using non-invasive EEG signals associated with human natural motor behavior does not require extensive training. We propose a new BCI method, where users perform either sustaining or stopping a motor task with time locking to a predefined time window. Nine healthy volunteers, one stroke survivor with right-sided hemiparesis and one patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) participated in this study. Subjects did not receive BCI training before participating in this study. We investigated tasks of both physical movement and motor imagery. The surface Laplacian derivation was used for enhancing EEG spatial resolution. A model-free threshold setting method was used for the classification of motor intentions. The performance of the proposed BCI was validated by an online sequential binary-cursor-control game for two-dimensional cursor movement. Event-related desynchronization and synchronization were observed when subjects sustained or stopped either motor execution or motor imagery. Feature analysis showed that EEG beta band activity over sensorimotor area provided the largest discrimination. With simple model-free classification of beta band EEG activity from a single electrode (with surface Laplacian derivation), the online classifications of the EEG activity with motor execution/motor imagery were: >90%/∼80% for six healthy volunteers, >80%/∼80% for the stroke patient and ∼90%/∼80% for the ALS patient. The EEG activities of the other three healthy volunteers were not classifiable. The sensorimotor beta rhythm of EEG associated with human natural motor behavior can be used for a reliable and high performance BCI for both healthy subjects and patients with neurological disorders. Significance: The proposed new non-invasive BCI method highlights a practical BCI for clinical applications, where the user does not require extensive training. © 2008 IOP Publishing Ltd.

publication date

  • March 1, 2008

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 24

end page

  • 35

volume

  • 5

issue

  • 1