Do G-CSF mobilized, peripheral blood-derived stem cells from healthy, HLA-identical donors really engraft more rapidly than do G-CSF primed, bone marrow-derived stem cells? No! Article

Elfenbein, GJ, Sackstein, R, Oblon, DJ. (2004). Do G-CSF mobilized, peripheral blood-derived stem cells from healthy, HLA-identical donors really engraft more rapidly than do G-CSF primed, bone marrow-derived stem cells? No! . 32(1), 106-111. 10.1016/j.bcmd.2003.09.024

cited authors

  • Elfenbein, GJ; Sackstein, R; Oblon, DJ

fiu authors

abstract

  • For more than a decade, the notion that peripheral blood-derived stem cells engraft more rapidly than bone marrow-derived stem cells after high-dose therapy has dominated our thinking. Recently, reports that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induces a proteolytic marrow microenvironment have provided mechanistic support for that belief, compelling us to review our own experience of 29 consecutive transplants with HLA-identical blood and marrow stem cells. In contrast to several reported randomized controlled trials, we found marrow stem cells engraft just as rapidly (median day 11 for granulocytes over 500/μl and median day 17 for platelets over 20,000/μl) as blood stem cells (median day 12 and median day 19, respectively) if the donor is treated with G-CSF in the same manner before marrow harvest as the donor is treated with G-CSF before leukapheresis. These observations with healthy HLA-identical donors confirm the results of our prior randomized autotransplant study. We propose the concept that the level of activation of the stem cells (induced by G-CSF) determines engraftment kinetics and not the anatomical site of derivation. © 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

publication date

  • January 1, 2004

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 106

end page

  • 111

volume

  • 32

issue

  • 1