Considering individual differences in the design of preventive interventions: HIV primary prevention as an example Article

Wagner, EF, Brown, LK, Brenman, AJ. (1995). Considering individual differences in the design of preventive interventions: HIV primary prevention as an example . 16(2), 187-200. 10.1007/BF02407339

cited authors

  • Wagner, EF; Brown, LK; Brenman, AJ

fiu authors

abstract

  • This study examined how individual differences in personality style influenced children's receptivity to HIV primary prevention. Prior to taking part in a HIV prevention program, 123 fifth graders from an ethnically diverse inner city school district were administered the Weinberger Adjustment Inventory (WAI) and scales measuring HIV-related beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge. The HIV scales were readministered at the conclusion of the program. WAI groups (formed by contrasting dimensions of restraint and distress) were found to differ significantly on measures of knowledge about HIV, HIV-related fears, safe behavior attitudes, and risk behavior at pre-test. The intervention's impact, as reflected in scale change scores, did not show significant differences among WAI groups. Although subtle differences were evident among groups, findings suggest that HIV primary prevention programs may be equally effective among children with differing degrees of self-restraint and distress. © 1995 Human Sciences Press, Inc.

publication date

  • December 1, 1995

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 187

end page

  • 200

volume

  • 16

issue

  • 2