Hierarchical structure and biomineralization in cricket teeth Article

Xing, XQ, Gong, Y, Cai, Q et al. (2013). Hierarchical structure and biomineralization in cricket teeth . 37(2), 10.1088/1674-1137/37/2/028001



cited authors

  • Xing, XQ; Gong, Y; Cai, Q; Mo, G; Du, R; Chen, ZJ; Wu, ZH

fiu authors

abstract

  • The cricket is a truculent insect with stiff and sharp teeth as a fighting weapon. The structure and possible biomineralization of cricket teeth are always interesting. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, and small angle X-ray scattering techniques were used to probe the element distribution, possible crystalline structures and size distribution of scatterers in cricket teeth. A scanning electron microscope was used to observe the nanoscaled structure. The results demonstrate that Zn is the main heavy element in cricket teeth. The surface of a cricket tooth has a crystalline compound like ZnFe2(AsO4)2(OH) 2(H2O)4. The interior of the tooth has a crystalline compound like ZnCl2, which is from the biomineralization. The ZnCl2-like biomineral forms nanoscaled microfibrils and their axial direction points towards the top of the tooth cusp. The microfibrils aggregate randomly into intermediate filaments, forming a hierarchical structure. A sketch map of the cricket tooth cusp is proposed and a detailed discussion is given in this paper. © 2013 Chinese Physical Society and the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Modern Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and IOP Publishing Ltd.

publication date

  • February 1, 2013

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

volume

  • 37

issue

  • 2