Effects of audiovisual stimuli on psychological and psychophysiological responses during exercise in adults with obesity Article

Bigliassi, M, Greca, JPA, Barreto-Silva, V et al. (2019). Effects of audiovisual stimuli on psychological and psychophysiological responses during exercise in adults with obesity . 37(5), 525-536. 10.1080/02640414.2018.1514139

cited authors

  • Bigliassi, M; Greca, JPA; Barreto-Silva, V; Chierotti, P; Oliveira, ARD; Altimari, LR

fiu authors

abstract

  • The present experiment sought to further understanding of the effects of personalised audiovisual stimuli on psychological and psychophysiological responses during exercise in adults with obesity. Twenty-four participants (Mage = 28.3, SD = 5.5 years; MBMI = 32.2, SD = 2.4) engaged in self-paced exercises on a recumbent cycle ergometer and three conditions (sensory stimulation [ST], sensory deprivation [DE], and control [CO]) were administered. Perceptual (attentional focus and perceived exertion), affective (affective state and perceived activation), and psychophysiological (heart rate variability) parameters were monitored throughout the exercise bouts. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare self-reported and psychophysiological variables (main and interaction effects [5 Timepoints × 3 Conditions]). The results indicate that ST increased the use of dissociative thoughts throughout the exercise session (ηp2 = .19), ameliorated fatigue-related symptoms (ηp2 = .15) and elicited more positive affective responses (ηp2 = .12) than CO and DE. Accordingly, personally-compiled videos are highly effective in ameliorating exertional responses and enhancing affective valence during self-paced exercise in adults with obesity. Audiovisual stimuli could be used during the most critical periods of the exercise regimen (e.g., first training sessions) when individuals with obesity are more likely to focus on fatigue-related sensations.

publication date

  • March 4, 2019

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 525

end page

  • 536

volume

  • 37

issue

  • 5