Cerebral mechanisms underlying the effects of music during a fatiguing isometric ankle-dorsiflexion task Article

Bigliassi, M, Karageorghis, CI, Nowicky, AV et al. (2016). Cerebral mechanisms underlying the effects of music during a fatiguing isometric ankle-dorsiflexion task . 53(10), 1472-1483. 10.1111/psyp.12693

cited authors

  • Bigliassi, M; Karageorghis, CI; Nowicky, AV; Orgs, G; Wright, MJ

fiu authors

abstract

  • The brain mechanisms by which music-related interventions ameliorate fatigue-related symptoms during the execution of fatiguing motor tasks are hitherto under-researched. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of music on brain electrical activity and psychophysiological measures during the execution of an isometric fatiguing ankle-dorsiflexion task performed until the point of volitional exhaustion. Nineteen healthy participants performed two fatigue tests at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction while listening to music or in silence. Electrical activity in the brain was assessed by use of a 64-channel EEG. The results indicated that music downregulated theta waves in the frontal, central, and parietal regions of the brain during exercise. Music also induced a partial attentional switching from associative thoughts to task-unrelated factors (dissociative thoughts) during exercise, which led to improvements in task performance. Moreover, participants experienced a more positive affective state while performing the isometric task under the influence of music.

publication date

  • October 1, 2016

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 1472

end page

  • 1483

volume

  • 53

issue

  • 10