Music and cortical blood flow: A functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fnirs) study Article

Bigliassi, M, Barreto-Silva, V, Kanthack, TFD et al. (2014). Music and cortical blood flow: A functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fnirs) study . 7(4), 545-550. 10.3922/j.psns.2014.4.13

cited authors

  • Bigliassi, M; Barreto-Silva, V; Kanthack, TFD; Altimari, LR

fiu authors

abstract

  • The function of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) appears to be more activated in men than in women when it is conditioned to emotional situations via external stimuli. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of different music genres on PFC oxygenation according to gender. Eighteen healthy volunteers (10 males and 8 females), aged 20-28 years (mean: 22.25 ± 2.34 years), participated in the study. They remained in silence, and hemoglobin levels in a linear scattering were recorded (O2Hb [oxyhemoglobin] and HHb [deoxyhemoglobin]). When this procedure was finished, music was played for 1.5 min. The results showed that different genres of music might change cortical oxygenation in several ways, and such modulation may be related to gender. We conclude that music modulated cortical oxygenation in the PFC in both the right and left hemispheres, and differences in cortical oxygenation were highly related to gender. Furthermore, preferred and motivational songs can be considered the most important for increasing blood flow in the listening process.

publication date

  • June 1, 2014

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 545

end page

  • 550

volume

  • 7

issue

  • 4