Relationships among parental monitoring and sensation seeking on the development of substance use disorder among college students Article

Kaynak, O, Meyers, K, Caldeira, KM et al. (2013). Relationships among parental monitoring and sensation seeking on the development of substance use disorder among college students . 38(1), 1457-1463. 10.1016/j.addbeh.2012.08.003

cited authors

  • Kaynak, O; Meyers, K; Caldeira, KM; Vincent, KB; Winters, KC; Arria, AM

fiu authors

abstract

  • Substance use disorder is a serious health problem that tends to manifest in late adolescence. Attempting to influence targetable risk and protective factors holds promise for prevention and treatment. Survey data from 1253 college students (48.5% male, 26.9% non-White) were used to investigate the independent and combined effects of two prominent factors, sensation seeking and parental monitoring, on the probability of alcohol and/or cannabis dependence during the first year of college. In multivariate analyses that controlled for high school use, gender, race, mother's education, and importance of religion, retrospective reports by the student of parental behavior during the last year of high school indicated that higher levels of parental monitoring had a direct effect on reducing risk for alcohol dependence during the first year of college, but not on cannabis dependence. High levels of sensation seeking were associated with increased risk for both alcohol and cannabis dependence. No interaction effects were found. The results extend prior findings by highlighting influences of pre-college parental monitoring and sensation seeking on the probability of alcohol and/or cannabis dependence during the first year of college. The findings also suggest that these two factors are useful in identifying college students at high risk for alcohol and/or cannabis dependence. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

publication date

  • January 1, 2013

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

start page

  • 1457

end page

  • 1463

volume

  • 38

issue

  • 1